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Month: October 2018

WordPress 5.0 Beta 2

WordPress 5.0 Beta 2 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

There are two ways to test the WordPress 5.0 Beta: try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”), or you can download the beta here (zip).

WordPress 5.0 is slated for release on November 19, and we need your help to get there. Here are some of the big issues that we fixed since Beta 1:

Block Editor

We’ve updated to the latest version of the block editor from the Gutenberg plugin, which includes the new Format API, embedding improvements, and a variety of bug fixes.

Meta boxes had a few bugs, and they weren’t showing at all in the block editor, so we’ve fixed and polished there.

Internationalisation

We’ve added support for registering and loading JavaScript translation files.

Twenty Nineteen

The Twenty Nineteen repository is a hive of activity, there have been a stack of minor bugs clean up, and some notable additions:

  • There’s now a widget area in the page footer.
  • Navigation submenus have been implemented for mobile devices.
  • Customiser options have been added for changing the theme colours and feature image filters.

Everything Else

The REST API has a couple of bug fixes and performance improvements. PHP 7.3 compatibility has been improved.


We’re fixing the bugs:
All the ones you’ve reported.
Some that we’ve found, too.

WordPress 5.0 Beta 1

WordPress 5.0 Beta 1 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version, and if you are using an existing test site be sure to update the Gutenberg plugin to v4.1.

There are two ways to test the WordPress 5.0 beta: try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”), or you can download the beta here (zip).

WordPress 5.0 is slated for release on November 19, and we need your help to get there. Here are some of the big items to test so we can find as many bugs as possible in the coming weeks.

The Block Editor

The new Gutenberg block editor is now the default post editor!

The block editor provides a modern, media-rich editing experience. You can create flexible, beautiful content without writing a single line of code, or you can dive into the modern programming APIs that the block editor provides.

Even before you install WordPress 5.0, you can try the block editor here.

Of course, we recognise you might not be ready for this change quite yet. If that’s the case, you can install the Classic Editor plugin now, which will keep the editor you’re familiar with as the default, even after you upgrade to WordPress 5.0.

Twenty Nineteen

Along with the new block editor, we have a new default theme, called Twenty Nineteen, which takes advantage of the new features the block editor provides.

You can read more about Twenty Nineteen in its introduction post, and follow along with development over on the GitHub repository.

Default Themes

Of course, we couldn’t release a beautiful new default theme, and leave all of our old ones behind. All the way back to Twenty Ten, we’ve updated every default them to look good in the new block editor.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages! A known issue: the block autocompleter fails for blocks named in with characters in non-Latin scripts. Adding blocks via the plus sign works, and this bug is fixed in the Gutenberg 4.1 plugin. 🙂

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


Minor bug fixes
Add up one by one by one
Then you change the world

The Month in WordPress: September 2018

The new WordPress editor continues to be a major focus for all WordPress contribution teams. Read on to find out some more about their work, as well as everything else that has been happening around the community this past month.


Further Enhancements to the New WordPress Editor

Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest update for the editor includes great new features, such as reusable content blocks, a dark editor style, export and import of templates, and much more. In addition, the Gutenberg team has published a comprehensive guide to the features currently included in the editor.

Users can test Gutenberg right now by installing the plugin, which currently has over 450,000 active installs according to the new Gutenberg in Numbers site. Along with that, the Gutenberg Handbook has some very useful information about how to use and develop for the new editor.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the #gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Work Begins on WordPress 5.0

After initially announcing a minor v4.9.9 release, the Core team has shifted their focus to the next major release — v5.0. One of the primary factors for this change is that Gutenberg is nearly ready to be considered for merging into Core, with the goal to complete the merge in v5.0.

To maintain flexibility in the development process the final timelines are not yet determined, allowing work already done for v4.9.9 to be moved to v5.0 if needed. Ensuring that WordPress is compatible with the upcoming PHP 7.3 release is a high priority for the Core team. Once a final decision is made, the details will be announced on the Core team blog.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.


Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.