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WordPress 5.0.3 Maintenance Release

WordPress 5.0.3 is now available!

5.0.3 is a maintenance release that includes 37 bug fixes and 7 performance updates. The focus of this release was fine-tuning the new block editor, and fixing any major bugs or regressions.

Here are a few of the highlights:

For a full list of changes, please consult the list of tickets on Trac, changelog, or read a more technical summary on the Make WordPress Core blog.

You can download WordPress 5.0.3 or visit Dashboard → Updates on your site and click Update Now. Sites that support automatic background updates have already started to update automatically.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 5.0.3:

Aaron Jorbin, Alex Shiels, allancole, Andrea Fercia, Andrew Nevins, Andrew Ozz, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), bobbingwide, Csaba (LittleBigThings), David Binovec, David Herrera, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), Felix Arntz, Gary Pendergast, Gerhard Potgieter, Grzegorz (Greg) Ziółkowski, Jb Audras, Job, Joe McGill, Joen Asmussen, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, kjellr, laurelfulford, Marcus Kazmierczak, Milan Dinić, Muntasir Mahmud, Nick Halsey, panchen, Pascal Birchler, Ramanan, Riad Benguella, Ricky Lee Whittemore, Sergey Biryukov, Weston Ruter, and William Earnhardt.

WordCamp US 2019 dates announced

Save the date! The next WordCamp US will be held on November 1-3, 2019, in beautiful St Louis, Missouri. One of our largest events of the year, WordCamp US is a great chance to connect with WordPress enthusiasts from around the world. This is also the event that features Matt Mullenweg’s annual State of the Word address.

We’d love to see you in St. Louis next year, so mark your calendar now!

WordPress 5.0 RC3

The third release candidate for WordPress 5.0 is now available!

WordPress 5.0 will be released on December 6, 2018. This is a big release and needs your help—if you haven’t tried 5.0 yet, now is the time!

To test WordPress 5.0, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.0, please see the first release candidate post.

This release candidate includes a fix for some scripts not loading on subdirectory installs (#45469), and user locale settings not being loaded in the block editor (#45465). Twenty Nineteen has also had a couple of minor tweaks.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.0 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.0. If you find compatibility problems, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure those out before the final release. An in-depth field guide to developer-focused changes is coming soon on the core development blog. In the meantime, you can review the developer notes for 5.0.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


WordPress Five Point Oh
Is just a few days away!
Nearly party time!
?

WordPress 5.0 RC2

The second release candidate for WordPress 5.0 is now available!

This is an important milestone, as we near the release of WordPress 5.0. The WordPress 5.0 release date has shifted from the 27th to give more time for the RC to be fully tested. A final release date will be announced soon, based on feedback from this RC. This is a big release and needs your help—if you haven’t tried 5.0 yet, now is the time!

To test WordPress 5.0, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.0, please see the previous release candidate post.

Changes since RC1

  • Make the Image Link URL field readonly.
  • Merge similar text strings for i18n.
  • Improve block preview styling.
  • Simplify sidebar tabs aria-labels.
  • Fix getSelectedBlockClientId selector.
  • Fix IE11 focus loss after TinyMCE init. Add IE check.
  • Fix Classic block not showing galleries on a grid.
  • Fix visual issues with Button block text wrap.
  • Fix an issue where the block toolbar would cause an image to jump downwards when the wide or full alignments were activated.
  • Fix modals in Edge.
  • Move editor specific styles from style.scss to editor.scss in Cover block.
  • Apply IE11 input fix only when mounting TinyMCE.
  • Avoid rendering AdminNotices compatibility component.
  • Change @package names to WordPress.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


RC bittersweet.
We welcome in Gutenberg,
Vale Gutenbeard.

WordPress 5.0 Release Candidate

The first release candidate for WordPress 5.0 is now available!

This is an important milestone, as we near the release of WordPress 5.0. The WordPress 5.0 release date has shifted from the 27th to give more time for the RC to be fully tested. A final release date will be announced soon, based on feedback on the RC. This is a big release and needs your help—if you haven’t tried 5.0 yet, now is the time!

To test WordPress 5.0, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

What’s in WordPress 5.0?

Screenshot of the new block editor interface.The new block-based post editor.

WordPress 5.0 introduces the new block-based post editor. This is the first step toward an exciting new future with a streamlined editing experience across your site. You’ll have more flexibility with how content is displayed, whether you are building your first site, revamping your blog, or write code for a living.

The block editor is used on over a million sites, we think it’s ready to be used on all WordPress sites. We do understand that some sites might need some extra time, though. If that’s you, please install the Classic Editor plugin, you’ll continue to use the classic post editor when you upgrade to WordPress 5.0.

Twenty Nineteen is WordPress’ new default theme, it features custom styles for the blocks available by default in 5.0. Twenty Nineteen is designed to work for a wide variety of use cases. Whether you’re running a photo blog, launching a new business, or supporting a non-profit, Twenty Nineteen is flexible enough to fit your needs.

The block editor is a big change, but that’s not all. We’ve made some smaller changes as well, including:

  • All of the previous default themes, from Twenty Ten through to Twenty Seventeen, have been updated to support the block editor.
  • You can improve the accessibility of the content you write, now that simple ARIA labels can be saved in posts and pages.
  • WordPress 5.0 officially supports the upcoming PHP 7.3 release: if you’re using an older version, we encourage you to upgrade PHP on your site.
  • Developers can now add translatable strings directly to your JavaScript code, using the new JavaScript language packs.

You can read more about the fixes and changes since Beta 5 in the last update post.

For more details about what’s new in version 5.0, check out the Beta 1, Beta 2, Beta 3, Beta 4 and Beta 5 blog posts.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.0 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.0. If you find compatibility problems, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure those out before the final release. An in-depth field guide to developer-focused changes is coming soon on the core development blog. In the meantime, you can review the developer notes for 5.0.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Ruedan los bloques
Contando vivos cuentos
Que se despiertan