Word Press

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WordPress 5.1 Beta 1

WordPress 5.1 Beta 1 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

There are two ways to test the WordPress 5.1 beta: try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want to select the “bleeding edge nightlies” option), or you can download the beta here (zip).

WordPress 5.1 is slated for release on February 21, and we need your help to get there. Here are some of the big items to test so we can find as many bugs as possible in the coming weeks.

Site Health Check

Site Health Check is an ongoing project aimed at improving the stability and performance of the entire WordPress ecosystem. The first phase of this project is included in WordPress 5.1. For the first time, WordPress will catch and pause the problem code, so you can log in to your Dashboard and see what the problem is (#44458). Before, you’d have to FTP in to your files or get in touch with your host.

Additionally, in April 2019, WordPress’ will increase its minimum supported PHP version to 5.6. To help you check if you’re prepared for this change, WordPress 5.1 will show you a warning and help you upgrade your version of PHP, if necessary.

For Developers

  • The Cron system can now be more easily replaced with a custom cron handler (#32656).
  • When starting cron under PHP-FPM, the connection will return a response immediately, even for long running cron jobs (dev note).
  • WP_DEBUG_LOG can be set to a custom log location (#18391).
  • Introduced the wp_blogmeta table (#37923).
  • Added LIKE support to meta_key comparisons in WP_Meta_Query (#42409).

There have been over 360 tickets closed in WordPress 5.1, with numerous small bug fixes and improvements to help smooth your WordPress experience.

Keep your eyes on the Make WordPress Core blog for more developer notes (which are assigned the dev-notes tag) in the coming weeks detailing other changes in 5.1 that you should be aware of.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


Miss my haiku?
I will have plenty for you
in the coming weeks.

The Month in WordPress: December 2018

New features, a big event, and important announcements marked December as a milestone month for the WordPress community.


Release of WordPress 5.0

On December 6 WordPress 5.0 was released. This release includes the much anticipated new block editor as the default editing experience. While some users have chosen to continue using the Classic Editor on their sites, many site owners have quickly upgraded to this latest version.

Two security and maintenance releases came out over the course of the month, with the latest update providing a huge boost to performance and stability.

The new version of WordPress comes a new default theme: Twenty Nineteen. This theme is designed to highlight how the block editor can be used.

Want to get involved in developing WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Gutenberg Phase 2

The next phase of Gutenberg is being decided, starting with widgets, which will make it easier for users to customize their sites. This will be done with features being added to the Gutenberg plugin.

Want to get involved in develop the future of the WordPress dashboard? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

9 Projects for 2019

WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg outlined 9 projects for the year 2019. These projects range from creating a block for navigations menus, porting all existing widgets into blocks, forming a triage team to tackle open issues on Trac and more.

A status update for porting existing widgets to blocks has been posted by Mel Choyce.

WordCamp US 2019 Dates announced

WordCamp US 2019 will be held during Nov. 1-3, 2019, in St Louis, Missouri. It will be one of our largest events of the year and will feature Matt Mullenweg’s annual State of the Word address.


Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WordPress 5.0.1 Security Release

WordPress 5.0.1 is now available. This is a security release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

Plugin authors are encouraged to read the 5.0.1 developer notes for information on backwards-compatibility.

WordPress versions 5.0 and earlier are affected by the following bugs, which are fixed in version 5.0.1. Updated versions of WordPress 4.9 and older releases are also available, for users who have not yet updated to 5.0.

  • Karim El Ouerghemmi discovered that authors could alter meta data to delete files that they weren’t authorized to.
  • Simon Scannell of RIPS Technologies discovered that authors could create posts of unauthorized post types with specially crafted input.
  • Sam Thomas discovered that contributors could craft meta data in a way that resulted in PHP object injection.
  • Tim Coen discovered that contributors could edit new comments from higher-privileged users, potentially leading to a cross-site scripting vulnerability.
  • Tim Coen also discovered that specially crafted URL inputs could lead to a cross-site scripting vulnerability in some circumstances. WordPress itself was not affected, but plugins could be in some situations.
  • Team Yoast discovered that the user activation screen could be indexed by search engines in some uncommon configurations, leading to exposure of email addresses, and in some rare cases, default generated passwords.
  • Tim Coen and Slavco discovered that authors on Apache-hosted sites could upload specifically crafted files that bypass MIME verification, leading to a cross-site scripting vulnerability.

Thank you to all of the reporters for privately disclosing the vulnerabilities, which gave us time to fix them before WordPress sites could be attacked.

Download WordPress 5.0.1, or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click Update Now. Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

In addition to the security researchers mentioned above, thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 5.0.1:

Alex Shiels, Alex Concha, Anton Timmermans, Andrew Ozz, Aaron Campbell, Andrea Middleton, Ben Bidner, Barry Abrahamson, Chris Christoff, David Newman, Demitrious Kelly, Dion Hulse, Hannah Notess, Gary PendergastHerre Groen, Ian Dunn, Jeremy FeltJoe McGill, John James Jacoby, Jonathan DesrosiersJosepha Haden, Joost de Valk, Mo Jangda, Nick Daugherty, Peter Wilson, Pascal Birchler, Sergey Biryukov, and Valentyn Pylypchuk.

WordPress 5.0 RC3

The third release candidate for WordPress 5.0 is now available!

WordPress 5.0 will be released on December 6, 2018. This is a big release and needs your help—if you haven’t tried 5.0 yet, now is the time!

To test WordPress 5.0, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.0, please see the first release candidate post.

This release candidate includes a fix for some scripts not loading on subdirectory installs (#45469), and user locale settings not being loaded in the block editor (#45465). Twenty Nineteen has also had a couple of minor tweaks.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.0 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.0. If you find compatibility problems, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure those out before the final release. An in-depth field guide to developer-focused changes is coming soon on the core development blog. In the meantime, you can review the developer notes for 5.0.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


WordPress Five Point Oh
Is just a few days away!
Nearly party time!
?

WordPress 5.0 RC2

The second release candidate for WordPress 5.0 is now available!

This is an important milestone, as we near the release of WordPress 5.0. The WordPress 5.0 release date has shifted from the 27th to give more time for the RC to be fully tested. A final release date will be announced soon, based on feedback from this RC. This is a big release and needs your help—if you haven’t tried 5.0 yet, now is the time!

To test WordPress 5.0, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.0, please see the previous release candidate post.

Changes since RC1

  • Make the Image Link URL field readonly.
  • Merge similar text strings for i18n.
  • Improve block preview styling.
  • Simplify sidebar tabs aria-labels.
  • Fix getSelectedBlockClientId selector.
  • Fix IE11 focus loss after TinyMCE init. Add IE check.
  • Fix Classic block not showing galleries on a grid.
  • Fix visual issues with Button block text wrap.
  • Fix an issue where the block toolbar would cause an image to jump downwards when the wide or full alignments were activated.
  • Fix modals in Edge.
  • Move editor specific styles from style.scss to editor.scss in Cover block.
  • Apply IE11 input fix only when mounting TinyMCE.
  • Avoid rendering AdminNotices compatibility component.
  • Change @package names to WordPress.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.


RC bittersweet.
We welcome in Gutenberg,
Vale Gutenbeard.

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